Curtain Time At The Yale Club

A notice was recently posted that it’s curtain time on October 19th at the Yale Club with whom we share valued quarters.

Years ago, I was Veep of the Dartmouth Club of New York in the Yale Club and in fact negotiated much of the sale of the family business to Onward Kashiyama in the now deposed Big Green lounge on the seventh floor. Other co-members of the YC include fraternity DKE (Delta Kappa Epsilon) and the University of Virginia. It’s not all Boola Boola.

The Clubhouse was designed by James Gamble Rogers '89 and hailed for its dignified neoclassical design. Upon opening its doors in 1915, the building became the largest clubhouse in the world and continues to be the largest college clubhouse in existence today.

Four other clubs affiliated with Ivy League universities have clubhouses in the surrounding neighborhood: the Harvard Club of New York, the Princeton Club of New York, the Penn Club of New York City, and the Cornell Club. The neighborhood also includes similar clubs not affiliated with universities, like the New York Yacht Club and the University Club of New York.

The Yale Club 22-story clubhouse contains three dining spaces (the "Tap Room," the "Grill Room," and the Roof Dining Room and Terrace), four bars (in the Tap Room, Grill Room, Main Lounge, and on the Roof Terrace), banquet rooms for up to 500 people like the 20th floor Grand Ballroom, 138 Guest Rooms, a library, a Fitness and Squash Center with three international squash courts and a swimming pool, and a barber shop, among other amenities.

The heart of the clubhouse is the main lounge, a large room with a high, ornate ceiling and large columns and walls lined with fireplaces and portraits of the five Yale-educated United States presidents, all of whom are or were members of the Yale Club: William Howard Taft, Gerald R. Ford, George H. W. Bush, Bill Clinton, and George W. Bush.

Club wardrobe requirements remain extant: The House Committee requests that all members and guests observe the following dress requirements:

Traditional business attire or business casual dress, as defined below, is required in all public rooms except for the athletic facilities at all times. At all times a reasonable standard of neatness should be observed.

Business casual dress includes collared shirts, blouses, turtlenecks, sweaters, dress slacks, khakis, corduroy trousers, skirts, or dresses.

Denim: neat, clean, and in good repair (no holes, rips, or tears) – is permitted in the Library, Grill Room, Roof Dining Room, and on the weekends throughout the Clubhouse. All other above restrictions apply.

Not permitted: shorts, tee shirts, casual sandals, athletic wear of any kind (including sweatpants, caps, and team jerseys), and torn, provocative, or revealing clothing.

The beat goes on. Club members in the neighborhood historically serve as founts of tweed amongst our customer base. Welcome back.

C’mon baby let the good times roll

 

RICHARD PRESS

20 comments

Nothing is better than an invite when in town to the Yale Club! And yes a good reason to wear my tweeds and corduroys and my custom shirts from J.Press! Fall is here!

Sims Harrigan October 25, 2020

Harris tweed, I should have said, sorry.

Anthony L October 23, 2020

With all due respect, the word “Curtain” is a marker in a play script of the end of an Act or the Play. No wonder the unguarded (such as myself) panicked and had to call the New Haven branch for reassurance. You mean you are once again, post Panicdemic, Open! Thank God. Where else would one get a decent real Scottish tweed coat (jacket) in this benighted mass market Manhattan we now have to live in?! Hooray.

Anthony L October 23, 2020

Thanks to my late Father Jerry Haber, I would enjoy a special day spent at the Yale Club back in 1982. The occasion was marked as a High School graduation gift for me-when I worked part-time on Saturdays at J. Press. Irving Press was the host and I was the delighted guest, as I had lunch at the Yale Club and got to go to the squash courts.

Jeffrey Haber October 19, 2020

“Curtain time” means the beginning of a performance, actually.

Robert Stump October 19, 2020

Those of you asking if the Yale Club has closed… No in fact it is re-opening after having to close due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Since late March the doors have been closed and they have now open the doors to some of the rooms. Possibly “lifting the curtain again” would’ve been a better title. The J.Press store is open as strong as ever with its great service.

Anthony Kalamut October 19, 2020

Curtain time means the curtain is raising. The beginning. Curtains means the end.

DAVID THOMPSON October 19, 2020

Oops—redo the headline: should be Curtain Up At The Yale Club. Borrowing from “Gypsy”: Curtain up! Light the lights! You got nothing to hit but the heights! …..Honey, everything’s coming up Rose’s for me and for you!

Richard Press October 19, 2020

From the Yale Club website:

“Thank you for visiting The Yale Club of New York City. We are excited to inform you that The Yale Club of New York City will enter its first phase of reopening on October 19th. Thank you for your patience and continued support. We look forward to welcoming you back!”

John Thompson October 19, 2020

This piece is reporting that the Club is now reopening, with safety protocols in place, after being closed during the pandemic.

Richard Grimm October 19, 2020

A quote from STANDARD OF CONDUCT, a recent novel and satire by Frank Hazard: “Yale was like a ramshackle pawn shop managed by a decrepit old fool who didn’t know that the store had gone out of business.”

Donald Robert Wilson October 19, 2020

So, is it closing? Traditionally, that’s what curtain time means. How can that be possible? What percentage of the money is based on dues and endowment vs. selling Old Fashions in the multiple bars?

Todd McNichols October 19, 2020

I am confused. What does “curtain time” mean? Is the Club closing? The rest of your text doesn’t sound like it, but I would like to be sure. (I went to Harvard and so this is mostly an academic question, but even so.)

David Schraa October 19, 2020

A very impressive facility, and one that apparently still values traditional and dignified attire as befitting its members. Thanks for sharing what those of us non-Yalies would ever see.
Is it true that, beginning today, all purchases at J. Press will come with a complimentary membership in the Yale Club???

Ross Ellison October 19, 2020

What do you mean by Curtain Time?. Are you closing the store there?
Please explain……

Richard I Adrian October 19, 2020

Sound like a grand time. I used to be a member of the Allegheny Harvard Yale and Princeton club while living in Pittsburgh. It was a small older club that dated back to the 1890s. It was a great place to sit in the afternoon and have a drink and read the newspaper.

PocketSquare October 19, 2020

How will this closing effect JP?

Bob Whidden H65 October 19, 2020

Unclear from the article-is the club closing? I certainly hope not-been a guest there many times and it is a treasure. Please say it is not closing.

Gary S. Glazer October 19, 2020

The two photographs show filthy sandstone outside and immaculate interior.

Disgusting for the neighbors who have to see the building’s exterior daily, the negative impression of tourists from other parts of the US and the world who see and remember this slumlike negligence, too bad for the reputation of the institution whose name the building bears.

Viewer October 19, 2020

Somewhere in my personal archives from the late ’60s I still have a copy of the application to the Yale Club which had to be submitted in typewritten or longhand format directly to the Secretary.

Robert W. Emmaus October 19, 2020

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